ANZCN Practice Note – Requirements for Authentication under the Apostille Convention

Notaries must be able to inform their clients whether or not the process of notarisation will involve an apostille, or an additional step involving an authentication or legalisation. The recent Practice Note issued by the Australian and New Zealand College of Notaries (ANZCN) states that:

“In every case, where a notary provides a notarial certificate or attestation, he […] should ensure that the notarial client is aware of the further need for the certificate to have an Apostille affixed or for authentication and consular legalisation to be carried out. In the case of some Commonwealth countries neither step is required.” (p1 ¶ 2)

For the sake of convenience, the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirements for Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents (5 October 1961) has removed the need for legalisation, which has been known as “chain certification”. However, this only applies to jurisdictions that have signed up to the Convention. Other jurisdictions which have not signed up to the Convention still require the additional step before the notarial act is completed.

As at September of 2017, 155 jurisdictions have signed up to the Convention. In all states of Australia, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is the authority under the Convention to issue apostilles and authentications, as the case requires. This list will likely continue to grow in coming years, and notaries must ensure that they are familiar with the appropriate process for their notarial act.

The Hague Convention website is updated when new jurisdictions subscribe to the scheme which removes the need for “chain certification”. Australia acceded to the Convention on 11 July 1994 and it entered into force on 16 March 1995. Australian Notaries should note however that major jurisdictions such as the People’s Republic of China are not signatories to the Convention at this time, nor are many countries to our near-north.

Notaries should also note that some Commonwealth countries do not require authentication or the apostille, and a straightforward act of notarisation is sufficient for it to be considered probative. The ANZCN suggests that notaries consult with the commentary in the Second Edition of Prof. Peter Zablud’s leading text Principles of Notarial Practice and in particular Appendix 14, “Authentication Requirements for Australian Notarial Acts.” The ANZCN Practice Note makes I explicitly clear that:

“In no circumstances and on no account, should a notary ever purport to complete or sign an Apostille or Authentication.” (p 3 ¶ 4)

Out additional comment: This Practice Note may seem trite and obvious to the experienced notary, however oftentimes it may be beneficial to reinforce key concepts and principles of notarial practice. Notaries in the common law jurisdictions provide an invaluable service to clients dealing with business and other personal affairs across jurisdictions and between different countries. The purpose and function of the Apostille and Authentication is to confirm that the notary and his seal is legitimate. For jurisdictions that are not signatories to the Convention, the process of legalisation by a Consular official of the country in which the notarial certificate is intended to be used essentially authenticates DFAT’s authentication of the notary’s seal. Of course, it is impossible for a notary to authenticate his own seal. Clients must be advised which steps are necessary for their particular notarial act to be seen as credible in the eyes of a foreign court or administrative body.

This is a summary of a Practice Note issued by the ANZCN. Practitioners who would like more details about the Practice Note should contact the College directly. Client who need documents to be notarised for use overseas in a court, administrative body or for business purposes are encouraged to contact a local notary via this website.